Chive Blossom Vinegar

This time of year the chives are growing well and sending up lots of scapes with flowers atop. We let ours grow in this year to add some colour to the herb garden. With such a bounty of flowers, I started to wonder what they could be used for. A friend of mine had the same thought so I did a quick search online for possible uses.

After typing “cloves” in google and obviously getting the wrong plant in my search results, my brain starting working again and I realized that I had taken dyslexia to a new level. There are lots of recipes out there for making chive vinegar, but I found that quite a few missed some key steps in preserving so I’ve added my version here.

First thing to do is locate chives in bloom. If you don’t have any in your own garden, I’d recommend permanently borrowing some from a friend. To do this, call said friend, invite them out for dinner, and don’t show up. While they are waiting for you, simply let yourself into their back garden and pillage their crops. Cut, don’t pull, the flowers right at the top of the scape. A little green won’t hurt, but too much and the colour of the final vinegar may not be the desired shade.

Once you have a good collection of blossoms, do not wash them. A lot of the recipes online specify washing that flowers. Why? Apparently people are afraid of bugs. Chives are a great insect repellent for your garden and if you do find any creepy crawlies on your flowers, just blow them off. If it really bothers you to think that a tiny insect may be in your vinaigrette, run back into the bubble you live in and breathe in the purified air, and take your medication. If you do wash them, you’ll lose the essence of outside and some of the flavour that the pollen will provide.

Sterilize a glass mason jar by either submerging in cool water and bringing to a boil, or by using a sulphite spray. When you are using even new jars, you must wash them well with soapy water before sterilizing. There is residue from the factory, and this should worry you more than insects.

In a saucepan boil some vinegar. I used white distilled vinegar (p.s. all vinegar in Canada is distilled by law) but you could also use white wine vinegar. Avoid apple cider vinegar as the taste is overpowering.

Stuff your blossoms in the jar and fill within half an inch of the lip with the hot vinegar. When filling your jar with blossoms, it really is the more the merrier. Push down any blossoms that won’t sink.

To create a seal between the jar and the lid, boil the kettle and pour some of the water in a dish with the lid of the jar dropped in. After two minutes, the rubber gasket will soften and then you can place the lid on the jar. Screw on the band (not too tight) and wait. Now stop waiting, and have a look at the liquid. It starts to bleach the flowers of their colour and take on a lovely pink hue. Leave the jar to sit in a dark place for a few weeks before enjoying.

Clove......errrr....... Chive vinegar

If you try this recipe, let me know how it works out for you, or how you dealt with the botulism.

Thoughts?